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    • 07/13/16
    • Consumer Goods
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    How to take control of the shopper’s purchase journey

    Understanding the shopper’s purchase journey is one of the toughest challenges manufacturers and retailers are facing today. However, armed with the intelligence on what route shoppers take when making a purchase, how different online and offline touchpoints influence their purchase decision, and which media they are exposed to, you can optimize your omnichannel strategy. So what do you need to do to take more control of the shopper’s purchase journey?

    • 07/08/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Does everybody need to do everything to do video right?

    If you were to cook up a video service for subscribers today, what ingredients would you need?

    The recipe for success would surely include a significant measure of exclusive content, mixed with a generous combination of subscriber and other data sets, served with full control over brand, content and delivery. And of course, appetizing presentation would also be crucial, regardless of screen size.

    But we’ve inherited a rather different offering, and the video content industry – previously horizontally split into studios creating content, and operators and networks curating and distributing it – is now gravitating towards a vertically integrated end-to-end model, inspired by Netflix and Amazon Prime. At the IBC conference in Amsterdam on September 10, 2016, a panel of industry leaders and experts will discuss how they see the future of video emerging.

    Getting the right recipe – Exclusive content, Flexibility, and Ease of Use

    The overwhelming reason that users sign up to Netflix is for its original content. In the GfK SVOD content consumption tracker, we have seen the importance of exclusive content grow, mirroring Netflix’s increasing investment in producing its own programming. Netflix-owned titles make up half of the top ten titles viewed on the service, and include dramas like “House of Cards” and “Orange is the New Black”, as well as factual series such as “Making a Murderer”.

    Amazon too is investing more in content creation, though it’s not yet the principal reason to subscribe. This is already changing, however, and we expect massive publicity and advertising around the launch of its original content series, such as the multi-million pound UK investment in “The Grand Tour”.

    Flexibility and ease of access – enabled by end-to-end control of content, platform and subscribers – are also key elements that underpin the attractiveness and value of subscription video on demand (SVOD) services. Our tracking shows that, far from being watched on the move and on mobile devices, the majority of content is viewed at home and on a TV screen. This is where the vertical integration of some services pays dividends, as they also control the method of delivery. More than half (54 percent) of viewing events for Now TV are watched on a TV screen using another device, and two thirds of these are through the Now TV box. The Amazon Fire device also drives most of the connected viewing for Amazon. The fact that Amazon can control the distribution of its app across connected devices, including its own branded product, adds more value for users.

    Finally, ease of use is crucial, too. Viewscape, our new global viewing study, shows that Netflix rates higher on satisfaction metrics than almost every other digital video provider in the UK, with the exception of BBC’s iPlayer.

    What’s next? SVOD and going direct

    For decades the industry has prospered with horizontally segmented industry models. If this indeed is the only blueprint, then it has huge implications for licensed content owners, broadcasters, networks, cable operators – even (smart) television manufacturers.

    Many players that have previously been part of the existing industry models are contemplating launching end-to-end vertical SVOD services. Going direct is a global trend. It is true for broadcasters (Globo’s AVOD launch in Brazil, November 2015), media owners (Turner’s FilmStruck, TYVO by Doğuş Media Group for Turkish drama) and cable operators (Sky’s Now TV). With everyone trying to go direct, will all these different services actually reach their respective targeted audiences or will there have to be consolidation?

    The industry – to some extent – has answers here, too. Smart TV manufacturers like Samsung are vying to become over-the-top content (OTT) hubs which help manage different “light” subscriptions. Even more interesting is Amazon’s move to offer its new Streaming Partner’s Program, which bundles video subscription services à la carte.

    The result could be a few powerful hubs with a menu of “light” subscriptions available. The key question for the future landscape is which players will be able to offer a hub, and which will have to become subsidiary services to the hub?

    I can’t wait to see what our panel of senior industry leaders and influencers including Christian Brent from Fox, Francesco Venturini of Accenture, Martin Guillaume from Ericsson, William Linders from UPC and Efe Cakarel of MUBI will have to say about the future of SVOD on 10th September.

    • 07/05/16
    • Health
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Three consumer forces propelling change in health & wellness

     

     

     

    Rescue a dog, rescue yourself. Take a digital Sabbath. Exercise: it’s good for the brain. Know your farmer. Go local. Consumer wisdom seems to be continually refreshing these days in health and wellness, with a growing focus on holistic health.

    Regardless of what you think of the science, it’s the reality you’re going to be marketing to if you’re in the health & wellness industry. And that applies to a growing number of categories, from Rx and OTC drugs, to food & diet, consumer electronics, apparel, pets, and cars. Practically every industry is in the health & wellness category today, as cure, prevention, or problem.

    New research from GfK Consumer Life, which I recently presented, suggests the opportunities and challenges will only increase in the coming years.

    The forces driving change

    Beyond trends you’ve heard of, like changing demographics and the cost of healthcare, these changes are being propelled by three distinct forces you probably weren’t aware of that we see in our research:

    • A motivated consumer. To say consumers today are involved in health & wellness is an understatement. Good health is #1 in Americans’ definition of “the good life.” Health is the #1 thing they would change in their lives. 2 in 3 consumers actively look for products and services that help them lead a healthy life. 3 of their 4 top priorities for self-improvement involve their health.
    • Shifting values. Consumer values are moving with a force that we have not seen in almost a decade. The values coming to the forefront are the kind that accelerate change. Among the three rising most: Creativity – +8 ranks globally and +11 ranks in the US since 2011 among 50 tracked values; Open-mindedness – +8 ranks globally and +7 ranks in the US since 2011; and Knowledge – +5 ranks globally and +4 ranks in the US. The bottom line: Consumers are looking for smart, creative solutions to help them live a healthy life.
    • Hunger for innovation. Across categories we see consumers gravitating to new ideas in health & wellness. Some are reactions to the marketplace status quo – for example, two in three consumers worry that antibacterial products kill good bacteria as well as bad. Some are technological: our latest surveys show that interest in fitness brands and apps continues to grow despite their well-documented problems, like data reliability (e.g. my fitness app recently mapped me running across the Central Park reservoir).

    The most intriguing shifts we see, though, are in attitudes. For trend researchers like us, these are stop-in-our-tracks, light-bulb moments. When attitudes shift, desires emerge. The result is white space for new products for the next 3, 5, 10 years, and beyond.

    Consumers aging differently

    We’re seeing this kind of space opening now in aging. It’s not just that populations are aging – that more than 1 in 5 Americans (67 million people) are now 60 or older, and that will grow in the next 20 years to 27% (99 million). People are aging differently. Increasingly, consumers see aging as an individual experience. Growing numbers reject the notion you can put an age on when “old” begins, saying it “varies too much.” Large numbers are turning away from the idea that you have to look as young as possible.

    Most intriguing, they’re becoming students of aging. 3 in 4 Americans tell us they want to age better than their parents and learn from their mistakes. Half tell us they’re buying products that will help them in their health or appearance as they get older.

    And here’s the interesting thing. It’s not just older consumers. More than 8 in 10 millennials feel our culture is “obsessed” with looking young; 73% hope to age better than their parents; and 46% are buying products to age smarter.

    Consumers, in sum, are motivated. They’re looking for smart, creative innovation. How will you respond?

    Jon Berry is a vice president and consultant at GfK Consumer Life. Email jon.berry@gfk.com to share your thoughts.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Watch a video recording of GfK Consumer Life’s webinar “Health & Wellness: The Consumer Perspective.”

     

    Contact us to learn more about how we can help you in your innovation and marketing in health & wellness.

     

     

    Download Now

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Appetite for mobile payment is growing, but only slowly
    • 06/30/16
    • Connected Consumer
    • Future of Retail
    • Global
    • English

    Appetite for mobile payment is growing, but only slowly

    Consumers are agreed on the ease and speed paying by mobile, but the appetite for it is growing slowly. Find out how Connected Consumers think about mobile payment.

  • Location loves Brand
    • 06/30/16
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Retail
    • Geomarketing
    • Fashion Talk
    • Connected Consumer
    • Geo+RealEstate
    • Global
    • English

    Location loves Brand

    Online or offline? This is a polarized debate among today's retailers, fueled by a desire to capitalize on new trends on one hand and a fear of being overwhelmed by them on the other. In the absence of facts, retailers and investors are often guided by emotions. This has resulted in a lack of investment in locations, stores and personnel, which makes it no surprise that success remains elusive. We believe it is a mistake for Fashion & Lifestyle retailers to overlook the importance of the physical point of sale …

  • “Experience economy” is the future of retail
    • 06/30/16
    • Press
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Retail
    • Geomarketing
    • Connected Consumer
    • Retail Consultancy
    • Global
    • English

    “Experience economy” is the future of retail

    A new report from GfK is available today that examines the co-evolution of innovative fashion and lifestyle stores alongside the increasingly significant “experience economy”. It identifies four key trends which can mitigate against the currently sinking retail share in private consumption that is prevalent in mature Western retail markets.

  • Monthly reports help electronics retailer grow market share
    • 06/24/16
    • Retail
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Monthly reports help electronics retailer grow market share

    Our point of sales data enables eXtra to align product availability with market demand, as well as optimize its product as sortment, distribution and pricing strategy.

  • “Always reachable” mindset is above 40 percent, led by Russia, China and Turkey
    • 06/22/16
    • Technology
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global Consumer Values
    • Global
    • English

    “Always reachable” mindset is above 40 percent, led by Russia, China and Turkey

    Internationally, 42 percent of the online connected population agree firmly1 with the statement “To me, it is important to always be reachable wherever I am” – and only 11 percent firmly disagree1.  However, four countries – Germany, Sweden, Canada and Netherlands – run counter to this trend, with more of their connected consumers firmly disagreeing than agreeing.

  • Fashion and lifestyle venues offer clues to the future of retailing
    • 06/20/16
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Fashion and lifestyle venues offer clues to the future of retailing

    Fashion and lifestyle is more affected by globalization and digitization than virtually any other industry. So what can retailers at large learn from those at the sharp edge? Discover the four key trends.

  • The fashion retail revolution
    • 06/20/16
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    The fashion retail revolution

    We’re on the cusp of a revolution in fashion retailing. Today’s connected environment means every fashion brand has to become a retailer too. We may think that mobile is the cause of the big disruptions, but we believe there is more radical change to come.

  • Global study: "always reachable" mindset
    • 06/17/16
    • Global Study
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Global study: "always reachable" mindset

    42% of internet users firmly agree it is important to be “always reachable” - but 4 countries go against the international trend.

  • It is important to always be reachable
    • 06/17/16
    • Global Study
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    It is important to always be reachable

    We asked the online population in 22 countries about how strongly they agree or disagree with the statement, "To me, it is important to always be reachable wherever I am".

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