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  • Tech Trends 2017 - Mobile payments
    • 03/01/17
    • Connected Consumer
    • Tech Trends
    • Global
    • English

    Tech Trends 2017 - Mobile payments

    Consumers are ready for a compelling mobile payment experience - and less loyal than ever before! Download our infographic and get the latest trends.

  • Tech Trends 2017 - Autonomous vehicles
    • 03/01/17
    • Connected Consumer
    • Tech Trends
    • Global
    • English

    Tech Trends 2017 - Autonomous vehicles

    The road ahead for autonomous cars is long and winding. Download our infographic and explore the four key challenges to achieving mass market take-up.

  • Tech Trends 2017 - Smart home
    • 03/01/17
    • Connected Consumer
    • Tech Trends
    • Global
    • English

    Tech Trends 2017 - Smart home

    In 2017, the hype about the fully connected smart home continues. Download our infographic and explore the top three reasons older Millennials monitor/control a device in their home.

  • GfK at eyeforpharma: exploring customer engagement
    • 02/24/17
    • Health
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    03/14/17 - 03/16/17
    GfK at eyeforpharma: exploring customer engagement

    Meet with GfK at eyeforpharma Barcelona 2017, the largest commercial pharma meeting of 1000+ industry leaders.

    • 02/24/17
    • Health
    • Consumer Goods
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Don’t call it a comeback: What health means to consumers today

    As we get busier and more distracted every day, key priorities like health often fall to the wayside.  But interestingly, health and fitness (defined as “making an effort to be in good physical and mental shape”) is a rising value globally; currently, it’s #12 on a list of 50 personal values tracked by GfK Consumer Life, up four ranks since 2011.  And nearly half (48%) of Americans believe that their eating habits, diet and overall health are better than their parents were at their age, a 6-point jump from 2012.

    After years of being back-burnered by the Great Recession, people finally feel ready to take a more active role in their own wellness.  But the return of health brings new questions: what does health mean to today’s consumer?

    Mind + body matters

    Most (69%) Americans agree that a key aspect of good health is “having a positive, optimistic state of mind and outlook on life” – #4 on a list of 12 possible health descriptors.  As new outlooks on health emerge, this is a critical one.  No longer are people consumed just with the number on their scale or the size of their jeans – they need to feel good, not just look good.  This outlook is more pronounced among those who are 60+, perhaps due to enhanced expectations for a longer, happier life.

    New nuances to fitness

    Almost six in ten (58%) Americans believe that “being physically fit” is included in their definition of “good health” – but it’s a bit more complex than that.  Other dimensions of physical fitness are actually ranked higher on this list, including the ability to do daily activities without obstacles (78%) and avoiding obesity (62%).  This heightened awareness of the impacts of fitness are evident in the top physical concerns Americans share about aging – gaining weight (34%) and loss of mobility (34%) are among the top five items on this list.

    With that in mind, it may come as no surprise that nearly two in three (65%) Americans exercise to keep fit weekly or more often; this habit is up six points since 2012.  And one in three (32%) admit that physical movement helps them treat health conditions they have.

    “Whole person” customization

    The marketplace for health and wellness solutions has expanded in recent years to include many more players.  Tech companies are competing with pharmaceutical leaders, and startups are often able to deliver solutions faster and more efficiently than more established brands.

    This is good news for the consumer.  Not only are there more products and services to choose from, the ability to personalize one’s wellness regimen has accelerated tremendously.  There’s a combination of solutions for everyone, whether it’s aging consumers who are focused on declining mobility and memory, younger individuals who care strongly about fitness, or the affluent audience drawn to more preventative health solutions.

    With wellness finally back on the front burner for consumers around the world and new spaces for a variety of companies to play a role, discussion of what “health” is will continue to grow – opening doors to new ideas on how to live healthfully.

    Rachel Bonsignore is a Senior Consultant for GfK Consumer Life.  She can be reached at rachel.bonsignore@gfk.com.

  • Vehicle features: Latest driver tech ‘very important’ to 1 in 3 people across 17 countries
    • 02/24/17
    • Technology
    • Automotive
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global Study
    • Consumer Life
    • Connected Consumer
    • Connected car
    • Global Consumer Values
    • Global
    • English

    Vehicle features: Latest driver tech ‘very important’ to 1 in 3 people across 17 countries

    GfK, has released findings showing which vehicle features, from a given list, people see as being ‘very important’ in a vehicle. 

  • Global study: vehicle features
    • 02/22/17
    • Global Study
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Global study: vehicle features

    Which features come top as ‘very important’ for a vehicle to have, according to consumers? What about latest vehicle technology? Download our global study and get the answer!

  • Car features: which are ‘very important’?
    • 02/22/17
    • Global Study
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Car features: which are ‘very important’?

    In our global study, 1 in 3 people across 17 countries say that latest driver technology is `very important´ to them. Download our infographics and explore the top 3 by country.

    • 02/21/17
    • Health
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Why biopharma needs to improve customer engagement

    Biopharma has no lack of touchpoints to optimize engagement with its most important stakeholders. Yet the industry is lagging behind in leveraging those crucial points of the customer journey to meet stakeholders where they are. Below are some suggestions for how biopharma can improve the customer experience and innovate successfully.

    1. Rethink engagement, experiences and relationships

    It’s time to question the effectiveness of pharmaceutical engagement with its stakeholders. The 15th Annual eyeforpharma Summit (March 14-16 in Barcelona) poses the questions*: “What’s stopping us from being patient-centric? Is it laziness? Or…is it simply too difficult to give up control?”

    The same organization recently partnered with The Health Perspectives Group** to review the state of direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising in North America. They concluded that pharma companies are still overly reliant on TV advertising blitzes and have under invested in authentic patient-centered stories delivered via digital channels. This addiction to old-school push marketing has inflated DTC spending, yet has led to a decline in DTC ad awareness and patient pull-through. How can an industry with such strong scientific roots and talent get it so wrong?

    1. Take advantage of the new digital realities

    Unclear guidance from regulatory agencies has led to genuine industry-wide caution when activating digital channels. However, this doesn’t explain a drop in digital pharma advertising spending (excluding search) in the US from 2015 to 2016. Digital shyness can’t be the result of resource constraints because TV, radio, magazine and radio ad spending all increased during this same period.

    What’s more, new drug applications (NDAs) are back to record highs, so the industry has a great innovation story to tell. And the mobile app surge continues even though most branded and unbranded health apps have few users. Meanwhile, companies are struggling to reorient and redeploy sales forces to take advantage of the new digital realities. We are in a post-iPad world, where the rep and account manager can be curators of targeted and relevant digital content. Yet biopharma still uses outmoded recall and share-of-voice metrics when gauging detail effectiveness.

    1. Innovate from a new playbook

    To paraphrase the futurist William Gibson: The future is already here, it’s just not widely distributed. Plenty of pioneering examples within and outside the biopharma industry heed some basic principles:

    • Build experience around the patient and customer, not around the product – beyond the pill can be more than a cliché.
    • Don’t rely on digital as a medium for pushing branded messages; rather, use it as an opportunity to connect in a two-way conversation.
    • Don’t try to exert too much control as a marketer because you are no longer in control – instead engage, reward, nurture and adapt.
    • Look outside our industry for great examples of enduring customer engagement and consumer-centricity – especially when developing unbranded ways of engaging.
    • Upgrade your multichannel marketing content – multichannel marketing requires multichannel content and multichannel measurements. For example, upgrade sales force effectiveness programs with multichannel modules.
    1. Draw from examples from pharma pioneers

    There are plenty of success stories such as AbbVie’s patient access programs, Novartis’ real-world psoriasis patient stories (fueled by the largest-ever global survey of PsO patients in over 30 countries) and Otsuka’s fusion of traditional and digital therapies. These are just a few of the pioneers that will gather at eyeforpharma in Barcelona in March to share the best and brightest ideas for engagement with patients and customers.

    1. Join us at eyeforpharma Barcelona in March

    Join the dialogue as we exchange ideas for advancing the art and science of customer engagement. I will be hosting the Digital Transformation and Customer Engagement tracks on Day 2 of the conference, Wednesday, March 15.

    If biopharma makes these five smart moves, they will have the tools to innovate through richer relationships with a breadth of stakeholders, by embracing the new digital reality and by continuing the transformative dialogue on customer engagement.

    The conversation continues outside of the conference. We invite you to join us for a meeting onsite anytime during the eyeforpharma program, or be our guest for a special dinner where you can meet other industry peers.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Join us Wednesday, March 15 at OneOcean Club, overlooking the beautiful Barcelona marina

     

     

     

    Schedule a meeting and join us for dinner at OneOcean

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Not going to Barcelona? Just click here to pre-register for GfK’s post-conference briefing sharing the best and brightest ideas from Barcelona.

    *Chairman comments in program for 15th Annual eyeforpharma Barcelona Summit

    **The Great DTC Shake-up: Patient perspectives on direct-to-consumer advertising

  • Explore the world of the Connected Consumers through our insights
    • 02/15/17
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Explore the world of the Connected Consumers through our insights

    Consumers are more connected than ever. New technologies and the benefits they bring have a significant impact on people’s behavior and their relationships with brands. Find out what that means for your business!

  • More people firmly agree with sharing personal data, in return for rewards, than firmly disagree
    • 01/27/17
    • Home Appliances
    • Financial Services
    • Consumer Health
    • Health Technology
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Home and Living
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Global Study
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    More people firmly agree with sharing personal data, in return for rewards, than firmly disagree

    Those aged 30-40 are most likely to share data for rewards. China, Mexico and Russia lead for people willing to share data. Germany, France and Brazil have the most people not willing to share data.

    • 01/26/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Square eyes: Are kids in the UK watching too much video?

     

     

     

    Did you watch the most recent episode of Homeland last night? Maybe you caught up on the new BBC drama Taboo, watched some YouTube clips or just had an evening of chilling in front of Netflix. Whether you viewed any video content or not last night, there is no denying that the way in which we watch video has changed drastically over the last 5-10 years. Long gone are my uni days of watching Neighbours at 5.35pm on a small TV screen in my or a classmate’s bedsit. If I were still watching it now, I could access it on demand and view it on my smartphone during my commute.

    But how is all of this media change affecting kids in the UK? How have their habits and behaviors changed with the advent of smartphones, tablets and catch-up services? Our ViewScape data from 2015, which provides a snapshot in time of viewing behavior, includes the viewing habits of children aged 1-17. Parents and guardians were asked to fill in the survey for young children. The survey requested information about the device that content was viewed on and whether viewing was linear or non-linear. The aim? To measure total video viewing across all devices, channels and platforms.

    Video consumption: What the data says

    When analyzing BARB data relating to 4-11 year olds, we can clearly see the change in traditional linear viewing on the TV set when we compare the figures for January to June 2006 with the same period in 2016. In 2016, people spent half an hour less viewing linear content per day than they did in 2006. Does this mean our kids are becoming more bookish or spending more time outside? According to our ViewScape data, even more video content is being consumed, just in different ways.

    Next time you are out shopping or eating at a restaurant, take a look around you at any nearby families with young children. My bet is that a device of some sort will be out to keep the kids quiet – is that Peppa Pig I see? Our ViewScape data shows that kids aged 1-11 consume 2 hours 37 minutes of video daily. This includes any viewing occasion, whether it’s using free online services such as BBC iPlayer and YouTube, or SVOD services Netflix and Amazon Prime Instant Video. With BARB showing that viewing on a TV set for kids aged 4-11 is 1 hour 47 minutes per day on average, we can see that new methods of viewing have significantly increased viewing time.

     

    Watching video on TV sets vs. online

    Ofcom’s ‘Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes’ report, published on the November 16, 2016, revealed that children’s internet usage had usurped that of viewing on the TV set for the first time. The capability that mobile devices offer has brought the internet age beyond the household and into the outside world, and not just for those of us who are over the age of 18.

    For this to happen, of course, access to a device is needed. While a number of young children use a device belonging to their parents or guardians, many now have their own. Tablets are the device of choice for kids aged 1-11, with more than 60% of all those who have access to a tablet possessing their own. On average, kids with access to a tablet device spend 24 minutes per day watching content, compared to 19 minutes and 13 minutes on PC/laptops and smartphones respectively. Brands such as Amazon and Kurio have facilitated this trend with kid-friendly tablets designed to keep children safe and secure from the vagaries of the World Wide Web.

     

    Conclusion

    Will kids continue to embrace these new, emergent behaviors as they move into adult life, or will they revert to a more traditional method of viewing on a TV set? Either way, it is clear that video viewing is increasing because of the media proliferation that has occurred. While it would be easy to conclude with the notion that watching more video content will cause kids to fry their minds, who’s to say that this trend won’t increase their intelligence? If it weren’t for YouTube, I would not have a clue how to install a washing machine! Let’s just remember to keep a balance in our lives and those of following generations. Too much of anything is bad for you, apparently.

    Nigel James is a Senior Research Executive at GfK. To share your thoughts, email nigel.james@gfk.com.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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