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  • More people firmly agree with sharing personal data, in return for rewards, than firmly disagree
    • 01/25/17
    • Global Study
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    More people firmly agree with sharing personal data, in return for rewards, than firmly disagree

    Explore our global study "Willingness to share personal data" and find out which countries lead for people willing to share data.

  • Global study: sharing data
    • 01/25/17
    • Global Study
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Global study: sharing data

    Over a quarter of internet users across 17 countries strongly agree that they are willing to share their personal data in exchange for benefits or rewards like lower costs or personalized service. Find out more in our global study!

  • How can you get closer to consumers during the innovation process?
    • 01/23/17
    • Health
    • Consumer Goods
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Connected Consumer
    • MarketBuilder
    • Market Builder Voice
    • Global
    • English

    How can you get closer to consumers during the innovation process?

    Find out more in our 10 min webisode how to be closer to your customers in the innovation process thanks to voice.

  • How can you deliver innovations in a shorter timeframe by reducing the risk of failed products?
    • 01/23/17
    • Health
    • Consumer Goods
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Connected Consumer
    • MarketBuilder
    • Market Builder Voice
    • Global
    • English

    How can you deliver innovations in a shorter timeframe by reducing the risk of failed products?

    Find out more in our 10 min webisode how to improve your innovation process and minimize the risk of product failure.

  • How can you deliver innovations that excite, engage, and energize consumers?
    • 01/23/17
    • Health
    • Consumer Goods
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Connected Consumer
    • MarketBuilder
    • Market Builder Voice
    • Global
    • English

    How can you deliver innovations that excite, engage, and energize consumers?

    Find out more in our 10 min webisode how to connect emotionally with your customer when you develop new product concept.

  • Three ways to deliver value and ensure innovation success with voice.
    • 01/23/17
    • Health
    • Consumer Goods
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Connected Consumer
    • MarketBuilder
    • Market Builder Voice
    • Global
    • English

    Three ways to deliver value and ensure innovation success with voice.

    Find out in our white paper how to reveal the emotions of your customers by listening to their voice.

    • 01/20/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Voice analytics unlocks critical insights for concept and ad research

     

     

     

    Many products go through a series of consumer tests before they hit the market. This is to measure how consumers will respond to them, allow for optimization and sift the wheat from the chaff. In the past this has led to some improvement of market reception but the number of product failures still remains really high. We have seen that traditional approaches to concept testing simply aren’t the best fit for purpose today. Businesses need an innovative approach that embraces people’s emotion and subconscious response and connection to a brand or product rather than only a rational and articulated response. We have seen that bringing in this emotional connection allows for a better prediction of success.

    Voice analytics: Holistic measurement for better insights

    Voice analytics in market research is opening up many avenues to better understand the consumer. It is now possible to measure Emotional Impact by simply asking respondents what they think of the new idea or experience. By listening to what (words) people say and how (tone, pitch, rhythm) they say it, both the implicit thinking (System 1) and explicit thinking (System 2) can be captured. This provides an authentic way to understand the emotional and rational impact of new products and experiences. Using voice analytics can shorten questionnaires and increase the amount of data gathered from consumers whilst increasing the engagement – a good thing for the industry!

    An application of this is to use the volume of unstructured data to capture these Voiced Thought Streams in response to key topics – like purchase journeys or in-store experience. We can now use this non-rational component of the response to understand the emotional reflection of the experience and to ask new and evolving questions. We are able to dig deeper into the in-the-moment journeys of consumers and understand how their day-to-day lives are working towards or hindering the short-term sales and long term Brand Equity.

    Voice analytics in ad testing

    Recently we tested popular ads in the UK market and the findings were quite profound. We combined the rational thought-out response and sentiment, along with the non-rational passion. This combination allowed us to understand a full 360 degree view of how the ads are being received by the market and the impact – emotional and rational – on the consumer.

    As expected, the flashy and quirky ads did well in engaging the audience. However, when we dug deeper, the brand mentions and associations for these ads were quite low and although people were engaged in the creative ads, the “boring” ads scored better on brand mentions and associations.

    The solution is not one or the other, but rather both – clearly the goal is engagement and brand association. Market research now has compelling and scale-able tools to measure both of these consumer parts to better measure ads and concepts to predict success.

    Bradley Taylor is the Country Manager of Consumer Experiences at GfK. Please email Bradley.Taylor@GfK.com to share your thoughts.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    • 01/12/17
    • Financial Services
    • Technology
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    The future of FinTech goes far beyond mobile wallets

    I must admit that I find the term “mobile wallet” a little silly. After all, wallets have always been mobile, right? At the same time, I am not at all averse to the idea of making transactions with my phone. I’m getting the hang of accessing coupons in stores, and I felt pretty cool the first time I got into the movies by having the ticket-taker scan my phone. I’m sure I will continue to move in this direction, although I consider myself mainstream rather than an early adopter in the area of financial technology (aka FinTech).

    Digital payment

    Pundits have been talking about the pros and cons of mobile wallets for several years now. Overall, these payment systems still face obstacles and adoption has been slow. Only 22 percent of American mobile phone users regularly pay for products by scanning, tapping, or passing their devices in stores, according to recent research conducted by GfK Consumer Life 2016.

    At the same time, other types of digital payment are entering the playing field, such as the UPI system introduced in India last year, which moves funds directly from the consumer’s financial account to the merchant’s without a middleman. India will be an important market to watch in terms of the shakeout among digital payment systems following demonetization. Indeed, developing markets such as India and Nigeria will be testing grounds for FinTech in general, as indicated by the growing use of biometric identification ranging from fingerprints to facial recognition and palm veins.

    Seamless shopping

    The AmazonGo concept, currently in test mode in Seattle (where else?) goes beyond the financial transaction itself to tackle other deterrents of in-store shopping. The idea is this: You scan your phone as you enter the store and go along your merry way grabbing the items you want. Then you walk out of the store, and your Amazon account is automatically charged for your purchase.

    Some may like the idea of avoiding checkout lines or the need to swipe/insert/tap/scan their payment device of choice and wait for approval. But what tickles my fancy is the prospect of cutting a couple of steps out of the usual tedious process of putting things in a cart, taking them out of the cart, putting them back in the cart, putting them in the car and taking them out of the car.

    If this idea catches on, I will be on board with it much faster than I am with self-checkout, which I personally find no improvement over regular checkout aisles. In the case of AmazonGo, the potential is not merely a streamlined financial transaction, but a streamlined shopping experience.

    Conclusion

    Ultimately, consumers will adopt FinTech to the extent that it makes their lives easier. Being different for novelty’s sake will only draw in the earliest adopters; the rest of us need to be sold on more practical benefits.

    • 01/06/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    3 usability tips every appliance manufacturer should consider

    The household appliance industry has been particularly impacted by rapid-evolving technology and Connected Consumer innovations. Our user experience (UX) researchers and designers are fortunate to see and test many cool-looking prototypes that integrate these innovations before they hit the market. While we draw some of our insights from UX best practices and years of experience in UX design of appliances, having a set of benchmarks in our arsenal makes recommendations that much more powerful.

    Measuring UX in household appliance research

    We have integrated a UX measurement tool in household appliance research over several years resulting in a robust benchmark database. A scientifically-validated tool, the UX Score offers holistic insight by combining pragmatic usability aspects (learnability, operability) with hedonic qualities such as usefulness (identification, stimulation) and look and feel; this results in a score that can be compared to competitor products, different versions of the product, or, in the case of household appliances, benchmarked for the category. Our database includes years of global research covering diverse product categories from cooktops to freezers.

    Diving deeper into the individual dimensions of the UX Score

    While the overall benchmark UX Score for household appliances indicates a good user experience through its relatively high value (about 5 on a scale from 1=low  to 6=high), researchers are likely familiar with the following situation: A consumer is excited about a new idea and design, but once they attempt to use it, the disappointment surfaces. So we must dive deeper into the individual dimensions of the UX Score.

    Here we see the mean benchmark values by dimension for the UX Score of household appliances.

    Mean benchmark values of each dimension including overall benchmark (orange line) for household appliances

     

    In the “inspiration” and “look and feel” dimensions, we see high benchmark values compared to the overall benchmark line. This is fostered by continuous innovations through new functionalities that show a stimulating effect on the product experience as well as the high-quality impression.

    The more pragmatic “operability” dimension represents the lowest value by comparison. The location of features and information do not conform to consumer expectations. The “learnability” dimension value is also reduced – a catchy and intuitive usage of household appliances is limited.

    How to improve the user experience for household appliances

    Based on this benchmark data and UX best practices, we have established three tips for household appliance manufacturers to improve the user experience of their products:

    • Define functions and interaction design before constructing the physical interface.
      Thereby you can perfectly place functions exactly where users expect them to be. This works much better than placing the function anywhere and then trying to explain it with an icon.
    • Involve hardware designers as early as possible in the concept development process.
      Designers and hardware experts should work together as early as possible in the concept development and testing process. This will ensure the pragmatic, as well as, hedonic aspects will gain attention.
    • Opportunity of thin-film transistor (TFT) displays should not be overstrained – avoid abundance of functions.
      TFTs offer a great opportunity to explain functions. Although consumers are very familiar with the interactions via touch, too many gimmicks lead to confusion and disorientation. If no TFT is available it becomes even more essential to focus only on the most relevant functionalities. Self-explanatory icons should be found for other functions, which are then tested as early as possible (see point 1).

    As household appliance innovations continue to evolve, the strengths (hedonic qualities) seem to be well-considered. To address the category weaknesses like operability and learnability, appliance manufacturers should apply a holistic user experience design process to keep classic usability aspects top of mind.

    Lena Tetzlaff is a User Experience Consultant at GfK. Please email lena.tetzlaff@gfk.com to share your thoughts.

    • 12/22/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Queen Elizabeth II – The jewel in the Netflix Crown?

    Released in its entirety on November 4, 2016 and reported to have cost around £100m to produce, The Crown is one of the most ambitious projects that Netflix has taken on to date.

    A 10 part original series (essentially a biopic) about Queen Elizabeth II, recounting her life from the royal wedding in 1947, right up to the present day, the show has been celebrated by all sides of the media, frequently being described as “faultless”, “magnificent”, “engaging” and “gripping”.

    So what do we know so far about The Crown’s first few weeks on the service? Firstly, amongst our sample of Netflix users, The Crown was the top streamed title on Netflix in November 2016, showing that the release has been heavily streamed amongst users. But what was driving users to the show? Sheer curiosity or perhaps something else?

    Netflix’s Marketing of The Crown

    30% of Netflix users said they watched The Crown because it was recommended to them by someone, or simply because it looked and sounded interesting. However, a third of users also said that they had watched the series because it featured in the ‘recently added’ section of the service, and half also claimed that external advertising had influenced their viewing choice.

    It is clear that Netflix were determined for this to succeed – not only was the show expensive to produce, but campaign spend across all media for The Crown was one of the highest of 2016  ensuring that the investment would not be appreciated by just users, but also reach and appeal to a wider audience.

    Finally, in November, compared with the rest of 2016, a higher proportion of respondents say they signed up to Netflix in order to watch exclusive content not available elsewhere. However, the jury is still out as to whether The Crown itself was driving this. Early indications are that it attracted existing users to view rather than acted as a drive to sign up new ones.

    Who was watching The Crown and why?

    In its first month of release, the demographic profile of those watching The Crown has shown some interesting results. Firstly, a fifth of the show’s viewers are aged 55+. This is a slightly higher proportion of older users watching than for Netflix content overall and also in contrast to new releases such as Stranger Things, which primarily attracted a younger audience within its first few weeks of release. It does highlight the strength of Netflix’s commissioning policy, allowing them to target different types of viewers by commissioning shows with differing demographic appeal.

    When asked why they started watching the title in the first place, respondents mostly indicated that it was because they had a general interest in the Queen or the Monarchy or because they wanted to find out more about this period of time in British history. But what is remarkable is how few people said they started watching the title because of the A-list cast that has been employed (Claire Foy and Matt Smith both star), or because of the quality of the production for the title, further demonstrating that this title was perhaps designed to target an audience of lighter viewers less engaged by marquee names and more by the program content.

    Was The Crown a success?

    Defining a success when talking about Netflix titles can be difficult. If we look at overall content ratings, The Crown performed well. When asked to rate the show on a scale of 1 to 10, The Crown achieved an average score of 9.0 which is higher than all  Netflix titles that score an average of 8.7. Compared to other recent celebrated titles, such as Stranger Things, Making a Murderer and Narcos, The Crown achieves relatively similar levels of satisfaction.

    Furthermore, when we look at whether viewers are likely to recommend this title to others (again on a scale of 1 to 10), it scores in line with Netflix Originals on average, but slightly lower when compared to recent releases. So in terms of satisfaction and recommendation, The Crown can be called a success, but perhaps more was expected from this title, given the scale of investment into the show.

    Overall though, The Crown can be considered a success. Critics and viewers have both celebrated the show, and early data is indicating that the title is both driving viewing as well as appealing to a lighter viewing audience demographic for Netflix. Furthermore, exposure for the SVOD service has also increased due to positive press attention and increased marketing activity. Content producers like the BBC and ITV must have taken notice at the bigger financial bets Netflix are prepared to make to increase their audience shares, which must ultimately leave them slightly nervous about the future, and fortifying Netflix’s position as a serious threat to such traditional players in the media landscape.

  • Remaster your trade marketing to create the perfect promotional tune
    • 12/20/16
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Remaster your trade marketing to create the perfect promotional tune

    Ensure your trade marketing delivers greater ROI. Our promotion and retail marketing expert Karsten Holdorf will show you how to use different sales drivers in our webinar recording.

    • 12/20/16
    • Financial Services
    • Technology
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    2016: A technology-driven marketplace of Connected Consumers

     

     

     

    2016 was another banner year for Connected Consumers, who saw a number of new technologies emerge in a variety of categories across the marketplace.  Virtually every industry is adapting to a customer base that is becoming increasingly connected, changing the way they have conversations and relationships with brands.  But new connected products and services do not come without their challenges, which typically revolve around user experience and consumer awareness.

    Embracing the impact of technology

    Connected consumers of today are changing the existing value system and harnessing technology to reinvent themselves, their lives and their communities.  And the three key drivers of these changes are freedom, acceleration and intimacy.  It is obvious that trends in technology are growing and expanding rapidly… so, how can you maximize the opportunities that Connected Consumers offer?

    1. Provide them with freedom by making their lives convenient
    2. Give attention to acceleration by grabbing their attention quickly
    3. Redefine intimacy by getting up close and personal

     

    Stepping inside the smart home

    In the smart home category, there’s no shortage of offerings available, but the adoption of smart home products has been pedestrian thus far.  Our global study indicates that the appeal is there, but the benefits need to be more clearly communicated to consumers, who lack familiarity with the smart home category.  To find success, product developers must understand the varying needs in specific markets and communicate how smart home technology can seamlessly enhance the lives of consumers.

    Traveling in a connected world

    The travel and hospitality industry is getting smarter.  Invisible analytics, wearables, virtual reality and other technologies are revolutionizing the way that people research, shop for and experience travel.  From smart hotels to sporting events and music festivals, the connected traveler is able to unlock the world as they go, providing travel brands with new ways to engage them.  But disruptive competition and an overcrowded marketplace remain common roadblocks.  In the quest for customer loyalty, the companies that take a holistic view of each step of the purchase journey will be successful in understanding and anticipating market developments.

    Shopping in the future of retail

    In the Future of Retail, shopping isn’t all digital.  Connected Consumers still embrace the role of the store, shopping as much for an experience as for a product.  But online shopping offers another dimension, where Connected Consumers can compare prices and don’t have to wait in line to make a purchase.  Successful retailers will combine the positive facets from both channels, streamlining online shopping while also delivering on the promise of the in-store experience.

    A revolution in fashion and lifestyle

    While retailers experiment with omnichannel shopping, fashion and lifestyle brands are experiencing a revolution of their own.  Whether a pure online player, a local hero or a traditional fashion retail chain, it is vital to understand how consumers are changing in order to anticipate and prepare for the next season and beyond.  New paths to purchase have opened the door for competition, expanding the fight for customer loyalty to new frontiers.  Making sure your brand can be found and amplifying it with social media are ways to take control of the shopper’s purchase journey, but don’t forget the crucial role of the store.

    The future of financial services

    Financial services are another category being revolutionized by Connected Consumers.  From mobile payments to digital banking, Connected Consumers demand that their financial institutions are proactive and transparent.  Connected devices will play a key role in the future of payments, but players in the market must establish and communicate the importance of data security to build trust before adoption truly takes off.

    Programmatic advertising and the future of media

    Broadcast and print media has gone digital too, changing the way that Connected Consumers experience content and the devices they experience it on.  Media measurement is now more complicated than ever, with cross-device usage varying between markets and sociodemographics.  Programmatic advertising allows brands to deliver messages that resonate by building a single customer view that puts individual consumers at the center of marketing.

    Conclusion

    From brick and mortar stores to online shopping, and from inside the home to travels abroad, connected devices are changing the way that we see and interact with the world.  However, for innovation to truly thrive, Connected Consumers must be put at the heart of the connected revolution.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Get up close and personal with the Connected Consumer

     

     

     

    What every brand needs to know

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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