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  • GfK Consumer Life - Understanding the dimension of today’s Connected Consumers
    • 11/15/16
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    GfK Consumer Life - Understanding the dimension of today’s Connected Consumers

    How to discover the attitudes and behaviors of today’s connected consumer? Knowing their values, their motivations and learning why they act the way they do, is the path for your brand to engage and connect with customers all around the world. GfK Consumer Life provides you with a rich source of global consumer insights and trends. The main benefits? An exclusive client portal, offering on-demand access to all the insights that are essential to make the right decisions for your business - from launching a product to building sales or establishing a brand identity.

  • Moving up the ladder: Connected Consumers invest to create their dream homes
    • 11/10/16
    • Home Appliances
    • Home and Living
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Moving up the ladder: Connected Consumers invest to create their dream homes

    Home improvement is now a big trend. Find out what people in 22 countries answered when we asked them what home improvements they would most like to carry out.

  • Gardeners gets smart with robotic mowers
    • 11/10/16
    • Consumer Goods
    • Home and Living
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Gardeners gets smart with robotic mowers

    As in many other areas, consumers are keen to embrace technologies that make their lives easier. Find out in which country gardeners were the most enthusiastic adopters of robotic lawnmowers.

  • Optimize your below-the-line marketing spend
    • 11/09/16
    • Promotion and Causal Retail
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Optimize your below-the-line marketing spend

    Which of my marketing activities delivers the maximum return on investment? The solution lies in combining your point-of-sales data with competitive intelligence on your activities in-store, online or via print advertising.

  • Shoppers love bargains - but which promotions work best?
    • 11/09/16
    • Retail
    • Promotion and Causal Retail
    • Connected Consumer
    • Future of Retail
    • Global
    • English

    Shoppers love bargains - but which promotions work best?

    Retail marketing activities have a huge influence on shopping decisions. When we asked shoppers what influences their buying decisions, retail promotions ranked as a key factor.

    Have a look at our new infographic for more!

  • On-demand webinar: converting browsers into buyers
    • 11/04/16
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    On-demand webinar: converting browsers into buyers

    Don't miss this opportunity to enable your brand to get closer to Connected Consumers!

    • 11/03/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Maximizing crossmedia use: Why sociodemographic targeting still matters – Gen Z vs. Millennials

    Media consumption behavior has become increasingly fragmented across channels and devices, moreover marketers need to respect local characteristics of their markets. As stated in our last blog entry in June we investigated the crossmedia landscape of four markets. The result was four markets, four different stories. While in Indonesia mobile has become default, 80% of page impressions in Brazil happen on desktop screens.

    To forge effective marketing activities, we need to step back and take a closer look on the core element of communications: the target audience. Industry and research alike spend significant efforts to segment and survey consumers effectively. Psychographics, lifestyles and other attribution factors such as attitudes, purchases or online behavior need to be considered in order to assure that messages reach the right audience. But let’s take one step back for the moment and focus on the core data layer of each target audience: sociodemographics.

    Sociodemographics splits have received quite a bit of bad press recently. While much of the critique holds true that marketers need to think further than gender, age and household income, we should not be tempted to disregard those as of less value. Media consumption is still heavily depending on sociodemographic parameters – Let’s take a closer look at age cohorts as an example.

    Generation gap of online usage?

    Much has been discussed around the role of digital in the life of Millennials – Those individuals who have spent their childhood or teen years in the nineties. Within this time of their lives they have witnessed the rise of online, e-commerce and mobile and therefore are the age cohort more accustomed to digital media than their parent generation. But how do they compare to those who have been exposed to digital technology from their early childhood on, so those aged 14 to 24 years today? Are they really the proclaimed digital natives?

    Post-Millennial realities: Close up Social Media

    Social networking has become part of everyday life. But are there any differences on how Gen Z uses social media compared to Millennials? A closer look at the German market reveals similarities at first glimpse – the top three social media services are the very same among both age groups: Facebook, Instagram and Twitter rule the scene.

     

    While Facebook has a slightly higher reach among Millennials, the reach of Instagram and Twitter more than doubles among those aged 14 to 24 today. Around 50% of young individuals among the online population use Instagram and Twitter. But reach is only one indicator for the popularity of certain online services. Even more revealing are the figures for duration, the average time a unique user engages with each service in one month’s time. Compared to the millennial generation, the younger cohort spends almost triple the time on Instagram and Twitter. Together with their time they spend on Facebook, this adds up to over 14 hours of social media consumption per month on average.

    A further drill down into these figures reveals in addition: while Facebook is used almost evenly among females and males, Twitter has a higher share of male users (69%) compared to females in the Gen Z age cohorts. The same trend is, while less striking, also to be observed among Instagram users – 55% are male.

    Social media usage in emerging markets: Gen Z on the rise

    But how about youths in other markets – maybe the high involvement of Gen Z on social media is purely a phenomenon among mature online markets such as Germany. Let’s put the spotlight on two exemplary markets, Brazil and Turkey. Both markets have a similar degree of online maturity; on the other hand they are culturally worlds apart. When it comes to social media usage among youths however, both markets show a similar pattern to Germany – Facebook, Instagram and Twitter dominate the scene.

     

    While in Brazil Facebook is nearly ubiquitous, it’s again Instagram and Twitter with the higher reach among the younger cohort compared to Millennials. The photo sharing service app also reaches nearly ¾ of Gen Z in Turkey, while the presence of Facebook and Twitter are similar among ages.

    Leverage subgroup insights for media planning

    As we have clearly seen from the above example on social media usage, it would be neglectful to disregard sociodemographics, in this case age and gender. Especially among the younger age groups, online behavior tends to vary profoundly from other age cohorts – even compared to the generally digital savvy Millennials. Just look at the massive success of Pokémon Go among youths this summer – 42% of Gen Z was using the game app while only 25% of Millennials were out in the streets catching Pikachu.

    As programmatic advertising is becoming the normative element in online marketing, advertisers and inventory owners alike need to put emphasis on clean and robust data for efficient targeting. The same holds true for successful campaign effectiveness measurement, ROI calculations and CRM database enrichment.

    Deep drills into sociodemographics are just the starting point of getting familiar with your audiences towards crossmedia and crossdevice usage. The above case study on social media usage among Gen Z vs. Millennials is fully based on data provided by the GfK Crossmedia Visualizer. This cutting edge tool offers up to date, clear and deep insights to all relevant indicators of online usage across and by devices (PC, smartphone, tablet). Moreover the internet usage data is linked to unique users’ consumer profiles, including all relevant sociodemographic data and further profiling attributes such as media usage, TV consumption and lifestyles.

    To share your thoughts, please email ondrej.szabo@gfk.com. 

    • 10/27/16
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    The emerging relationship between brand and user experience

     

     

     

    Welcome to the world of the experience economy where experience triumphs over rationality. How consumers think and feel about your product or service is driven by the sum total of all their experiences with your brand. The user experience you provide equates to the delivery of your brand promise. To put it more starkly, how you make your customers feel will dictate how they perceive your brand now and in the future.

    Getting the user experience (UX) right is therefore no doubt top of your wish list. We know from our extensive work with brands around the world that small changes in UX can deliver significant and meaningful gains in terms of long-term brand equity. In a recent study, we found that a 0.1 change in the mean UX Score (a validated measurement of usability, usefulness, and aesthetics calculated on a six-point scale) resulted in an increase of 1.3% in brand equity. The message is clear – get your UX right in the short and medium term, and growth will follow. There can’t be a better incentive for getting it right every time.

    What consumers think about your brand is influenced entirely by their experience

    The reality is that consumers are fickle creatures, overwhelmed with a plethora of choice. All too often brands only get one chance to engage with them. Once upon a time, the way to engage with these consumers was through paid media. The prevailing wisdom was that with enough investment in the right channels, customers would, in time, take notice. But this is no longer the case. The balance of power has now tipped in favor of today’s Connected Consumers. This means that brands are more reliant on earned media than ever before to reach consumers. This is why UX matters so much: what consumers think about your brand is influenced entirely by their experience with your brand.

    The key to success in today’s market lies in influencing earned media

    We know that customer experience impacts brand perception and earned media. For this reason, we see a strong argument for investing in your UX rather than paid and owned media. This offers you the opportunity to generate a better customer experience and more positive brand exposure. The resulting earned media should then deliver greater returns. It’s a strategy that benefits both the brand and the consumer, and one that’s primed for success.

    UX is the urgent challenge for today’s marketers

    Brands that make the necessary investment in UX will achieve bold, sustainable and effective growth. As a first step, you must be able to quantify the user experience in order to understand its impact on brand equity and relationship to market share. With a tool like the UX Score, you can quickly and cost effectively identify improvements that will delight customers. You can prosper in today’s experience economy and grow your bottom line.

    How do you tackle the challenge of earned media?

    To share your thoughts, please email david.robbins@gfk.com.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    We discussed this topic in greater detail and shared our research results in a webinar.

     

    The emerging relationship between brand and the user experience

     

     

    View the on-demand recording of this presentation

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    • 10/25/16
    • Automotive
    • Media Measurement
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Automotive marketing: Understanding the multiple touchpoints of the Connected Driver

    Today’s fragmented media landscape presents a significant challenge to automotive retailers seeking to maximize the efficiency of their online campaigns. The growing importance of online media combined with the proliferation of connected devices further exacerbates the problem. How can you influence automotive consumers in an increasingly connected world?

    Automotive marketers face a number of pressing concerns:

    • Which touchpoints should you activate to improve marketing communications?
    • How can you track the performance of online touchpoints?
    • Can you minimize scatter loss and maximize reach within your target group?
    • How can you get the most out of mobile?

    Understanding consumer behavior through audience measurement

    The answers to these questions lie in passive audience measurement. It reveals audience behavior, supports campaign efficiency and provides crucial insights into the purchase journey. It also allows marketers to understand consumer behavior across all channels and multiple devices. You can make informed decisions to optimize marketing strategies and to achieve growth. There are three key ways to measure your audience:

    1. For example, by revealing which websites your primary target group is using so you can plan your media spend more efficiently.
    2. By revealing the role your website plays in the purchase journey. By knowing where users are coming from, you can increase traffic to your website and optimize your impact.
    3. You can identify which online touchpoints your target groups use, how frequently, and for how long.

    Maximize the effectiveness of your campaigns

    By providing key insights into consumer behavior online, cross-media measurement enables you to maximize the effectiveness of your campaigns and prioritize future spend for maximum return on investment.  Armed with these crucial insights, you will be equipped to create compelling marketing strategies that will engage consumers and deliver a solid return to your bottom line.

    To share your thoughts, please email ondrej.szabo@gfk.com. 

    • 10/24/16
    • Automotive
    • Media Measurement
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Automotive sales: A long and winding road

    When a consumer drives a new car off the forecourt it marks the beginning of one journey and the end of another. The path to purchase is a long and winding road. In all likelihood, today’s Connected Consumer will have consulted numerous sources of both paid and earned media. They will have had multiple interactions with the brand, both online and in the showroom. Only then will they make a final purchase decision. Each touchpoint will have had an impact on the final outcome. These moments matter, both to you and to your customers.

    Consumers choose how they access information about your brand

    Consumers have a vast array of possible information sources on which to base their purchase decision. They range from popular car shows and expert reviews to banner ads and social media. But they also have a choice about how, where and when they access information about your brand. Shopping for cars is now truly omnichannel. Consumers use many channels and devices to gather information along their purchase journey.

    Your challenge is to understand how consumers engage with each of the channels, and to optimize your marketing across all devices.

    Car shopping goes mobile

    Ten years ago, the prospect of using a mobile device to shop for a car would have been unthinkable. Now, the smart phone is the shopper’s best friend – and the automotive sector is no exception to that rule. With online playing an increasingly important role, there is a clear need to optimize online marketing activities. These increase traffic to the touchpoints that drive purchase decisions. Marketers need to know which categories, websites, apps and content have the greatest influence over purchase decisions. Importantly, they need to understand how that varies by device.

    Understanding the customer’s purchase journey

    Our Crossmedia Link has been designed to help automotive clients understand the purchase journey. We track each and every touchpoint in the path to purchase to help you understand how, where and when consumers are encountering your brand, and most importantly, which interactions are converting into sales. This approach helps you understand your cross media exposure, optimize your media mix and realize the true value of incremental reach.

    Create compelling campaigns

    Integrating behavioral data from cross-media measurement, we can provide new insights into audience behavior, campaign efficiency and the customer journey.

    Using these insights enables you to understand your consumers’ media consumption by device more effectively and create compelling campaigns that will engage with consumers at key touchpoints in their decision making process.

    To share your thoughts, please email thomas.schmelzer@gfk.com.

    • 10/17/16
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    How retailers can build brand loyalty through mobile apps

    As mobile technology has increasingly become an everyday part of Connected Consumers’ lives, mobile apps present a unique opportunity for retailers, offering a direct line to consumers on the devices they carry with them everywhere. While branded apps have the potential to enhance the shopping experience, increase conversion and promote loyalty, they are constantly competing for the space on your mobile device with other apps, often being deleted or ignored after a single use.

    So, how can retailers design apps that transcend “one-off” usage and win real loyalty? Here are a few proven winning ways:

    • Inspire FoMO (fear of missing out) – Offering pop-up sales, information and other things on a time-sensitive basis throughout the year can attract shoppers and keep them coming back. Amazon’s Prime Day, for example, leveraged the feeling of FoMO by showing a timer on sale items with a status bar letting users know how many of them were still in stock. Amazon’s app also provided a watch-list of products that alerted users when a deal on items they were interested in went live. However, frequency is key, and they have continued to leverage FoMO post-Prime Day with Lightening Sales that are personalized based on items consumers have searched for in the past.
    • Encourage exploration – Browsing the web is the new daydreaming, a new way of killing time for today’s Connected Consumers. But apps used for e-commerce aren’t typically designed for unfocused browsing. They are primarily used by consumers who are serious and ready to buy, designed more around the transactional experience. If app designs were more attentive to encouraging exploration, comparison shopping and wish fulfillment, they would be more convenient for browsing, which could translate to more usage.
    • Provide more value – Shoppers will return to an app if it offers time and money saving benefits that they can’t get anywhere else. The Starbucks app, for example, allows users to store loyalty benefits such as coupons, deals, and points as well as offering a convenient mobile payment option. Apps that work in conjunction with a brick & mortar location to provide omnichannel perks can produce valuable benefits as well. The Kohl’s app provides free shipping if it is used to order an out-of-stock item while at the store, for example.
    • Make it easy to use – An effective app should be simple and easy to use. If accomplishing something on a website, the phone, or in-person is easier than using a mobile app, then the app is not serving its purpose. Tasks like making hotel reservations, finding restaurants, or checking the weather can all be done in no more than a few clicks on an app, whereas performing the same task on an actual website takes longer. Apps are meant to be used on the go, therefore the time it takes to use them can make or break the experience.
    • Bring consumers back to the app – Email messages from retailers typically drive readers to their website. By changing the direction of the funnel, retailers can encourage app use by creating a communication flow that pushes consumers to their app.

    Mimicking your marketing on other platforms is simply not enough. Giving consumers a reason to download and return to your app can provide a number of benefits, including brand loyalty. The more frequently apps are used, the more they become ingrained in their users’ habits. Making them easy and effective to use while providing value that shoppers can’t get elsewhere are keys to success in the future of retail.

    *’Taking the App Challenge: How Retailers Can Raise Their “Stickiness” to New Heights’ originally appeared in Internet Retailer.

    Please email wendy.wallner@gfk.com to share your thoughts.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Discover how to win the battle for the connected shopper of the future

     

     

     

    Learn more about the Future of Retail

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • How to get bigger in the business of fashion
    • 10/14/16
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    How to get bigger in the business of fashion

    We have developed a tool that enables you to have a thorough understanding of what consumers do both on and offline, in order to gain intelligence into the crucial ‘why’ of their actions.

    Accompany Jess on her purchase journey to find out how we can analyse various details about a specific journey to show a true picture of the consumer.

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