Möchten Sie zur deutschen Seite wechseln?JaNeina
Close

Connected Consumer Insights

clear all filters
    • 10/25/16
    • Automotive
    • Media Measurement
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Automotive marketing: Understanding the multiple touchpoints of the Connected Driver

    Today’s fragmented media landscape presents a significant challenge to automotive retailers seeking to maximize the efficiency of their online campaigns. The growing importance of online media combined with the proliferation of connected devices further exacerbates the problem. How can you influence automotive consumers in an increasingly connected world?

    Automotive marketers face a number of pressing concerns:

    • Which touchpoints should you activate to improve marketing communications?
    • How can you track the performance of online touchpoints?
    • Can you minimize scatter loss and maximize reach within your target group?
    • How can you get the most out of mobile?

    Understanding consumer behavior through audience measurement

    The answers to these questions lie in passive audience measurement. It reveals audience behavior, supports campaign efficiency and provides crucial insights into the purchase journey. It also allows marketers to understand consumer behavior across all channels and multiple devices. You can make informed decisions to optimize marketing strategies and to achieve growth. There are three key ways to measure your audience:

    1. For example, by revealing which websites your primary target group is using so you can plan your media spend more efficiently.
    2. By revealing the role your website plays in the purchase journey. By knowing where users are coming from, you can increase traffic to your website and optimize your impact.
    3. You can identify which online touchpoints your target groups use, how frequently, and for how long.

    Maximize the effectiveness of your campaigns

    By providing key insights into consumer behavior online, cross-media measurement enables you to maximize the effectiveness of your campaigns and prioritize future spend for maximum return on investment.  Armed with these crucial insights, you will be equipped to create compelling marketing strategies that will engage consumers and deliver a solid return to your bottom line.

    To share your thoughts, please email ondrej.szabo@gfk.com. 

    • 10/24/16
    • Automotive
    • Media Measurement
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Automotive sales: A long and winding road

    When a consumer drives a new car off the forecourt it marks the beginning of one journey and the end of another. The path to purchase is a long and winding road. In all likelihood, today’s Connected Consumer will have consulted numerous sources of both paid and earned media. They will have had multiple interactions with the brand, both online and in the showroom. Only then will they make a final purchase decision. Each touchpoint will have had an impact on the final outcome. These moments matter, both to you and to your customers.

    Consumers choose how they access information about your brand

    Consumers have a vast array of possible information sources on which to base their purchase decision. They range from popular car shows and expert reviews to banner ads and social media. But they also have a choice about how, where and when they access information about your brand. Shopping for cars is now truly omnichannel. Consumers use many channels and devices to gather information along their purchase journey.

    Your challenge is to understand how consumers engage with each of the channels, and to optimize your marketing across all devices.

    Car shopping goes mobile

    Ten years ago, the prospect of using a mobile device to shop for a car would have been unthinkable. Now, the smart phone is the shopper’s best friend – and the automotive sector is no exception to that rule. With online playing an increasingly important role, there is a clear need to optimize online marketing activities. These increase traffic to the touchpoints that drive purchase decisions. Marketers need to know which categories, websites, apps and content have the greatest influence over purchase decisions. Importantly, they need to understand how that varies by device.

    Understanding the customer’s purchase journey

    Our Crossmedia Link has been designed to help automotive clients understand the purchase journey. We track each and every touchpoint in the path to purchase to help you understand how, where and when consumers are encountering your brand, and most importantly, which interactions are converting into sales. This approach helps you understand your cross media exposure, optimize your media mix and realize the true value of incremental reach.

    Create compelling campaigns

    Integrating behavioral data from cross-media measurement, we can provide new insights into audience behavior, campaign efficiency and the customer journey.

    Using these insights enables you to understand your consumers’ media consumption by device more effectively and create compelling campaigns that will engage with consumers at key touchpoints in their decision making process.

    To share your thoughts, please email thomas.schmelzer@gfk.com.

    • 10/17/16
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    How retailers can build brand loyalty through mobile apps

     

     

     

    As mobile technology has increasingly become an everyday part of Connected Consumers’ lives, mobile apps present a unique opportunity for retailers, offering a direct line to consumers on the devices they carry with them everywhere. While branded apps have the potential to enhance the shopping experience, increase conversion and promote loyalty, they are constantly competing for the space on your mobile device with other apps, often being deleted or ignored after a single use.

    So, how can retailers design apps that transcend “one-off” usage and win real loyalty? Here are a few proven winning ways:

    • Inspire FoMO (fear of missing out) – Offering pop-up sales, information and other things on a time-sensitive basis throughout the year can attract shoppers and keep them coming back. Amazon’s Prime Day, for example, leveraged the feeling of FoMO by showing a timer on sale items with a status bar letting users know how many of them were still in stock. Amazon’s app also provided a watch-list of products that alerted users when a deal on items they were interested in went live. However, frequency is key, and they have continued to leverage FoMO post-Prime Day with Lightening Sales that are personalized based on items consumers have searched for in the past.
    • Encourage exploration – Browsing the web is the new daydreaming, a new way of killing time for today’s Connected Consumers. But apps used for e-commerce aren’t typically designed for unfocused browsing. They are primarily used by consumers who are serious and ready to buy, designed more around the transactional experience. If app designs were more attentive to encouraging exploration, comparison shopping and wish fulfillment, they would be more convenient for browsing, which could translate to more usage.
    • Provide more value – Shoppers will return to an app if it offers time and money saving benefits that they can’t get anywhere else. The Starbucks app, for example, allows users to store loyalty benefits such as coupons, deals, and points as well as offering a convenient mobile payment option. Apps that work in conjunction with a brick & mortar location to provide omnichannel perks can produce valuable benefits as well. The Kohl’s app provides free shipping if it is used to order an out-of-stock item while at the store, for example.
    • Make it easy to use – An effective app should be simple and easy to use. If accomplishing something on a website, the phone, or in-person is easier than using a mobile app, then the app is not serving its purpose. Tasks like making hotel reservations, finding restaurants, or checking the weather can all be done in no more than a few clicks on an app, whereas performing the same task on an actual website takes longer. Apps are meant to be used on the go, therefore the time it takes to use them can make or break the experience.
    • Bring consumers back to the app – Email messages from retailers typically drive readers to their website. By changing the direction of the funnel, retailers can encourage app use by creating a communication flow that pushes consumers to their app.

    Mimicking your marketing on other platforms is simply not enough. Giving consumers a reason to download and return to your app can provide a number of benefits, including brand loyalty. The more frequently apps are used, the more they become ingrained in their users’ habits. Making them easy and effective to use while providing value that shoppers can’t get elsewhere are keys to success in the future of retail.

    *’Taking the App Challenge: How Retailers Can Raise Their “Stickiness” to New Heights’ originally appeared in Internet Retailer.

    Please email wendy.wallner@gfk.com to share your thoughts.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Discover how to win the battle for the connected shopper of the future

     

     

     

    Learn more about the Future of Retail

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • How to get bigger in the business of fashion
    • 10/14/16
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    How to get bigger in the business of fashion

    We have developed a tool that enables you to have a thorough understanding of what consumers do both on and offline, in order to gain intelligence into the crucial ‘why’ of their actions.

    Accompany Jess on her purchase journey to find out how we can analyse various details about a specific journey to show a true picture of the consumer.

    • 10/12/16
    • Retail
    • Promotion and Causal Retail
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Trade marketing: Getting to grips with the bottom line

    As a manufacturer or retailer, you will invest heavily in marketing activities at the point of sale (POS). But do you, like so many in your sector, lack confidence in your investment decisions? Do you struggle to know to what extent you are achieving a healthy return on your spend? Well, let’s get to grips with what’s actually driving the bottom line.

    The impact of promotions

    From our research with brands across the world and multiple sectors, we know that retail promotions are having an impact on consumers. When we asked shoppers what influences their buying decisions, retail promotions ranked as a key factor. 44% of shoppers cited information at the shelf as influencing their shopping decisions, slightly ahead of in-store displays and product samples and demonstrations, both at 41%.

    Consumers are increasingly price sensitive

    We also know that today’s Connected Consumers are increasingly price sensitive. As a result, promotional activity is intensifying in a bid to woo bargain hunters with ever better deals. More than half of all shoppers (58%) compare prices between stores, an unmistakable sign that price is a key influencer of purchase. The message is clear: consumers pay attention to promotions and so you need to as well.

    Making the right investments

    You know that well-timed and executed marketing activities can close sales. But with so many possible activities to choose from, the difficultly lies in understanding which investments will deliver the greatest return on investment (ROI).

    If your life wasn’t complicated enough, the challenges you face around price, promotion and distribution are further exacerbated by the fast-paced omnichannel environment.

    In order to succeed in these highly competitive conditions you need to have a sophisticated understanding of which activities are actually driving your bottom line. You need insight into all elements of your and your competitors’ pricing, discounting, assortment and promotional activities both online and offline. And you need to understand how shoppers experience your product in context.

    Armed with such intelligence, you will be empowered to prioritize your budgets and select those retail executions that will drive sales and achieve real ROI. Furthermore, by integrating this information with real sales data, you can close the feedback loop and create winning strategies that will benefit you and your customers.

    Share your thoughts by emailing gregoire.lemaitre@gfk.com.

  • Innovation Landscape in Insurance
    • 10/12/16
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Innovation Landscape in Insurance

    Download Angelo Pierro’s presentation for brand examples of what winning tomorrow in this market can look like.

  • Insurance Incentives and Rewards in South Africa
    • 10/12/16
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Insurance Incentives and Rewards in South Africa

    Bradley Taylor investigates “Insurance incentives and rewards in South Africa”.

    What can you learn from the way rewards are used here to drive loyalty and business in this competitive market?

  • The future of insurance: Hong Kong perspective
    • 10/12/16
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    The future of insurance: Hong Kong perspective

    What’s the future of insurance in this lucrative market, asks Ronald Leung? He discusses the effects of technology on personalization and asks why insurance providers are being left behind.

    Are you maximizing this audience?

  • Robo-advice - “Build it and they will come”
    • 10/12/16
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Robo-advice - “Build it and they will come”

    Martin Grimwood looks to a future where human financial advisers are replaced by “Robo-advice”, algorithms that provide portfolio management.

    With traction in the US, is it about to take-off in the UK? Are you ready?

  • Lessons Learned - from FinTech’s impact across financial services
    • 10/12/16
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Lessons Learned - from FinTech’s impact across financial services

    This first of four presentations examines fintech’s impact on financial services. Tom Neri examines the partnerships that are re-imagining customer engagement on smartphones.

    Can you engage your customers on the small screen? 

    • 10/10/16
    • Technology
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Report from dmexco: Running to keep up with technology

     

     

     

    This year’s dmexco was attended by more than 50,000 visitors. The breadth of the program at the event highlighted the rapid speed of change in the digital market. From the internet of things to virtual and augmented reality, to data and marketing automation, there was much to debate. Here’s our take on two key discussions.

    Enriching data for better business

    This may not be a new topic, but the discussion has moved on from the role of data, to how organizations use the information they own to be most effective. There was much debate about how companies use their data and combine and enrich it with other sources. The resulting information can help optimize marketing and sales, customer insight and experience, and design new products and services. We’ve been doing this for many years with our clients, augmenting and maximizing their data with our own proprietary primary research such as point-of-sale figures and media measurement. The result can be competitive advantage and market leading positioning.

    Virtual and augmented reality

    Pokémon Go has brought augmented reality to a broad group of consumers and it was the example of many sessions. Following this example, we expect to see more brands embracing AR and VR in their advertising campaigns and even in their products. In the not too distant future it will be normal to select a holiday destination having “been there” through VR.  The key to success with this new technology is to understand what audiences it appeals to, and to use it meet the needs of the target group. As the Pokémon Go example showed, just having the technology isn’t enough – it must appeal to consumers. We’ll be watching this space, and helping our clients develop meaningful applications of this new technology.

    Summary

    What is clear from dmexco is technology is driving markets at a speed we have never experienced before. It is hard for businesses of all kinds to know where to focus their energy. New ideas take time to come to life as products and services in businesses, and so ideas we discussed at dmexco 2014 and 2015 are only now materializing. It may feel like business needs to run to stand still, but the key to success is still to understand your target audience and make sure to focus on their needs so you are in control of the future.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Want to learn more about the driving forces behind Connected Consumers?

     

     

     

    Discover the top tech trends of 2016

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    • 09/29/16
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Delivery 2.0: The new challenges – and opportunities – for retail

     

     

     

    Shoppers have a strong desire to receive goods when and where they want them, quickly and cheaply. Retailers are therefore harnessing the power of increasingly intelligent technology in order to fulfil this need.

    Most consumers (90%) who took part in our 2016 FutureBuy study have had goods delivered to their home, while almost half (48%) have used click and collect services. And these delivery methods are set to grow, with 76% of shoppers indicating that they will use home delivery more, and 38% saying they will increase their use of click and collect. Additionally, more than a quarter (28%) of shoppers claim they will use parcel lockers with greater frequency in the future.

    Indeed, being able to buy conveniently and speedily is the number one trend identified by our Retail Trend Monitor. But this is a challenge for retailers. Having the supply chain ready is a complex process. Furthermore, businesses have less control of the final part of the shopping process because deliveries are often outsourced.

    A focus on the “last mile”

    Being able to get a package to someone’s home fast, efficiently and cheaply is a competitive advantage. While retailers call the delivery process the “last mile”, shoppers often see it as the most important part of the process. Waiting for a parcel at home can be frustrating. For this reason, retailers have to develop ever more innovative ways for customers to receive deliveries on their own terms.

     

    Click and collect services have been popular in the UK for several years now, and there are several emerging solutions to the delivery challenge.

    Doddle will open 300 outlets across the UK in the next three years that shoppers can use to collect deliveries from. Located in and around train stations, and open seven days a week, Doddle uses a website as well as text and email alerts to notify shoppers when they have a delivery for collection. £24 million has been invested in the business, which also allows shoppers to return products via its outlets, taking the pain out of returning items.

    Newcomer Parcelly, which recently partnered with Costcutter Supermarkets Group, lets people pick up deliveries from its 2,500 UK locations, including its KwikSave, Mace and Simply Fresh stores. This is a win-win for the retail chain because shops earn commission on each parcel collected, and attract more customers into their stores. For consumers, it means collecting goods at a time and place that’s convenient for them.

    Amazon Prime is offering two-hour delivery slots to people in Berlin who subscribe to its annual service, and it is doing the same in some places in and around London. Also in the UK, AmazonFresh’s customers are now benefiting from one-hour delivery slots between 7am and 11pm. Since AmazonFresh launched this service, Tesco and Sainsbury’s have introduced same-day delivery. Tesco also offers a three-hour click and collect service. This type of competition has been called the start of the groceries “time war” by some commentators.

    Meanwhile, DHL plans to make deliveries to people’s Smart cars in Stuttgart by accessing their vehicles using a single-use code. DHL plans to expand this service to Bonn, Berlin and Cologne.

    The next level of delivery

    Not only are retailers having to offer goods at lower prices than rivals, they are also having to make deliveries (and returns) more efficient and flexible. However, the innovations won’t stop there, with retailers and entrepreneurs pushing the boundaries all the time.

    Amazon, for example, is experimenting with “anticipatory shipping”. Based on big data, it will predict what shoppers are going to buy before they make a purchase. It will then proactively ship out that product. Amazon is anticipated to have more luck with doing this for some categories than others. For example, it is expected that it will be easier to do this for consumables that follow more predictable purchasing patterns like diapers or baby food.

    Similarly, crowd-sourced deliveries such as Nimber and MyWays are changing the retail environment as well as the expectations of consumers. Both offer people ways to earn money. Nimber (in beta at the moment) pays people to drop off parcels to someone at an address near where they are travelling to anyway. DHL-owned MyWays is an app that lets people (‘MyWayers’) pick up parcels for others from a DHL service point for a set fee.

    With this new raft of ways for people to receive deliveries, the onus is on retailers to make sure they keep ahead of the game. That means matching consumers’ expectations, and fast.

    For more information, please contact Alejandro Mondragon: Alejandro.Mondragon@gfk.com.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Want to learn more about the Future of Retail?

     

     

     

    Download our report

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

General